Caterina Delli Carri

Caterina Delli Carri

Caterina Delli Carri

Caterina Delli Carri

Caterina was born in Puglia, in the south of Italy. She has always loved to draw. Since she was a child she invented stories and she put them on paper, she designed characters and she used to draw everywhere in her grandfather’s country house. She was enchanted looking at picture books to catch every little
detail. When she was 19 she moved to Rome and then Turin to study Visual Arts and Set Design at The Academy of Fine Arts. Caterina’s works are inspired mostly by nature, everyday life, old photos and childhood memories. She loves to take care of even the smallest details within an illustration.


Brightness Magazine | Exclusive Interview


  1. Tell us about you and when did you decide to be an illustrator?
    My name is Caterina delli Carri and I’m an illustrator. I was born in Puglia, southern Italy.
    When I was 19 I moved to Rome to study Visual Arts and Set Design at The Academy of Fine Arts and then moved to Turin where I specialized in Set Design for cinema and television.
    Currently I live in Tuscany where I work as a freelancer for magazines, children’s book and illustrator for different clients around the world.
    My curiosity brought me to explore several kinds of visual art, however drawing has always been part of my daily life.
    This passion for drawing led me to illustration. I started by taking some courses in some important Italian illustration schools and then continued on my own devoting myself to it.

2- What is your earliest memory of illustrating?
I’ve always loved to draw. Since I was a child I invented stories and I put them on papers, I designed characters and I used to draw everywhere in my grandfather’s country house. I was enchanted looking at picture books to catch every little detail.

  1. How would you describe your illustration style?
    I’m not sure how to define my style. I could say delicate and meticulous. Delicate for the choice of subjects and for the choice of colors. Meticulous because I love to take care of even the smallest details within an illustration.
  2. What do you hope people take away from your illustrations?

For me it is important that people can find some aspect of their life in my work, to be reflected in the characters or in the situations that I’ve created.

  1. What gave you the inspiration to start your work?

I have many sources of inspiration, illustrators and artists that I love, but it was precisely the need to express my inner voice that gave me the most important push.

  1. You have tried quite a lot of mediums and techniques, and all of them are so lovely, tell us about your experiences. Which one is your favourite? Why did you make it?
    I don’t have a favourite technique, it really depends on what I have to do and how I feel about it. Lately, I work a lot in digital, it is a way that allows me to express myself well as if I were working in traditional. But I never stopped experimenting with different techniques and sometimes mixing them.
  2. How do you prepare your work for production?
    All my works start from rough sketches especially in pencil drawn on notebooks or on loose sheets. Once I find the drawing I start to working on digital, defining the sign and coloring (which for me is one of the most amusing parts).
  3. Which one do you prefer, personal projects or ones for publishing houses and magazines?
    Good question! I prefer cool projects for publishing houses and magazines! Seriously, I would say both and I would say it depends on the moments. There are times when I would like to be able to cultivate more personal projects and others instead I can’t wait to test myself on commissioned projects.
  4. If you’re working on a project and are falling behind, would you ask for an extension to refine your illustration or submit an OK piece of work on time?
    I try not to get into this. To estimate the timing before taking job, it’s part of the job itself. But if that happens, I’ll get the chance to extend the deadline and finish the job properly.
  5. What would you do if a client kept rejecting all the drafts you present-ed them?
    Once I found myself in this situation and I believe that if a client doesn’t feel in line with your style, maybe he just needs to look for something different from yours. I would recommend a colleague more in line with what he is looking for.
  6. Is there anyone in particular that you would love to collaborate with?
    Actually there are so many editing houses and magazines I’d like to collaborate with, but in particular one of my dreams is to illustrate a cover of The New Yorker.
  7. Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?
    I see myself drawing! Learning and drawing! One thing that I’m sure of, is the constant curiosity and passion for this art, this will lead me to explore new techniques and different projects.